Toronto
Cycling in Toronto

Enjoy the sights and sounds of Toronto’s many neighbourhoods, its famous landmarks, waterfront and parks. It is home to tourist attractions such as the CN Tower, Royal Ontario Museum, the Art Gallery of Ontario and major theatre productions. Still there are many quiet, natural places to enjoy.

In the City of Toronto there's a variety of different bikeway types, and cycling programs, to help make your ride better. Bicycle lanes, cycle tracks, multi-use paths, sharrow marked routes and signed shared roadways are all part of the network. Visitors to Toronto will be pleasantly surprised by its large bikeway network consisting of more than 563 km of bicycle lanes, shared roadways and off-road paths - including the Waterfront Trail. There are plenty of off-road paths and parks to explore for those who want to stay off the city streets.

The Toronto Cycling Map is a great resource for planning your route to work, school, shopping, or simply to explore.   Hard-copy maps are produced by the City of Toronto and available free of charge.

Ride the City is an online bike route planning tool.  Ride the City uses Cycling information, and user feedback to suggest bike routes.

Toronto Islands  - From the beautiful homes on Ward’s Island, to the gardens of Centre Island, to the clothing-optional beach on Hanlan’s Point - there’s nothing like a bike ride on the Island. Miles of beaches, green grass, colourful flowers and the best views of the Toronto skyline.

From the beautiful homes on Ward’s Island, to the gardens of Centre Island, to the clothing-optional beach on Hanlan’s Point - there’s nothing like a bike ride on the Island. Miles of beaches, green grass, colourful flowers and the best views of the Toronto skyline.

Tommy Thompson Park / Leslie Street Spit – Located on the Toronto waterfront, Tommy Thompson Park is a unique urban wilderness minutes from downtown. The park is located on a man-made peninsula, known as the Leslie Street Spit, which extends five km into Lake Ontario and is over 500 hectares in size.

Don Valley Trail - The Don River watershed stretches about 32 kilometres from the Oak Ridges Moraine down to Lake Ontario. Although there is no end-to-end valley trail, the Don offers many opportunities for long and short walks/rides away from the city traffic.

Discovery Walks is a program of self guided walks that link city ravines, parks gardens, beaches and neighbourhoods. Informative signage will help you experience an area's heritage and environment.

Water Front Trail - The dynamic and exciting city of Toronto is a major urban gateway on Lake Ontario. It is home to tourist attractions such as the CN Tower, Royal Ontario Museum, the Art Gallery of Ontario and major theatre productions. Still there are many quiet, natural places to enjoy along the waterfront. Toronto's Waterfront Trail can be divided into three sections: Etobicoke (west), Toronto (central) and Scarborough (east) based on municipal boundaries prior to the City's amalgamation.